Criminal Justice Program

sheriff working with students to mark evidence in a mock crime scene

What will I learn?

Students in the criminal justice program will learn about the American criminal justice system: law enforcement, courts and corrections. They will learn basics of criminal law, criminology and juvenile justice.

The program strives to graduate students who will be assertive, bold, ethical, and positive practitioners in the future. They will be guided by balance, self-control, common sense, curiosity, sensitivity, education, and open, effective communication skills.

The foundation of these practitioners will be their integrity, desire to seek continued personal growth as a criminal justice employee and citizen, and ability to work cooperatively and loyally with cohorts, subordinates, superiors, and the public. Graduates should be prepared to offer leadership services to the community in return for the community's invested trust in them as criminal justice employees.

Students have the opportunity to participate in a practical crime scene class, ride-alongs with law enforcement and visit a correctional institution.

Associate of Arts

This program is targeted at careers in two areas, corrections and law. Students will focus on the law, crime, the way people think and act as well as general education courses. 

The corrections portion is designed to prepare students for a bachelor's degree and for careers such as juvenile officer, parole agent, adult probation officer, state and federal corrections officer, institutional counselor, and halfway house counselor.

Available at the Cheyenne main campus and online.

What can I do with this degree?

Graduates should continue their education at a four-year university. They often work in probation, parole, victim services, court administration and law enforcement.

This program is a popular base for prelaw students and provides a thorough understanding of the system they may be practicing in during their careers. Students in prelaw should select a broad base of courses at the undergraduate level. The practice of law normally requires a bachelor's degree, three years in graduate law school, and successful completion of the bar exam of the jurisdiction in which the law school graduate wishes to practice.

  • Criminal investigation crime scene practical on campus.
  • Criminal investigation crime scene practical on campus.
  • Criminal investigation crime scene practical on campus.
  • Criminal investigation crime scene practical on campus.
  • Criminal investigation crime scene practical on campus.
  • Criminal investigation crime scene practical on campus.
  • Criminal investigation crime scene practical on campus.
  • Criminal investigation crime scene practical on campus.
  • Criminal investigation crime scene practical on campus.

Career Information

Career Resources: Visit LCCC's Career Center to explore resources for selecting a program pathway and career/job data.

Cost of Attendance

For general college expense, students view LCCC’s tuition and fees Web page. Students in this program do not typically incur additional expenses.